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Ventilation/Perfusion (Lung) scan

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The main indication of this study is to diagnose pulmonary emboli, and to quantitate segmental lung function.

Preparation/instructions

When you were referred by your physician for a radiological exam, you may have been told about certain instructions to be done prior to the exam, or when you were scheduling your appointment, the scheduler should have informed you about the preparations that should be done prior to your exam. If you did not or if you want a recheck, you can refer to the information listed below.

Keep in mind that you may have been given some additional or different instructions, based on your own particular circumstances. If you have any questions, please call  our hotline 16171 or (202) 3336-3310 (Mohandeseen), (202) 2417 5556 (Heliopolis) or (202) 2528 4888 (Maadi) to speak with a radiologist . It is best to call between 10 a.m. and 10 p.m., Saturday through Thursday.

Instructions

 Before the lung scan, tell your doctor if you might be pregnant or if you are breast-feeding.

No special preparations are needed before having a lung scan.

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The procedure

A lung scan is usually done by a nuclear medicine technologist. The resulting pictures are usually interpreted by a doctor who specializes in evaluating nuclear scanning tests (radiologist or nuclear medicine doctor).

    You will need to remove any jewelry that might interfere with the scan. You may need to take off all or most of your clothes, depending on which area is being examined (you may be allowed to keep on your underwear if it does not interfere with the test). You will be given a cloth or paper covering to use during the test.

    During the scan, you will either lie on your back with the scanning camera positioned above your chest or you will sit with the camera positioned in front of you. The camera does not produce any radiation, so you are not exposed to any additional radiation while the scan is being done.

Ventilation scan

The ventilation scan takes about 15 to 30 minutes.

    For the ventilation scan, a mask will be placed over your mouth and nose. You will inhale the tracer gas through the mask by taking a deep breath and then holding it.

    The camera will start scanning for radiation released by the tracer and then will produce pictures of its distribution in your lungs. You may be asked to breathe the gas in and out through your mouth into a bag for several minutes. You may then be asked to hold your breath for short periods (about 10 seconds) and to change positions so your lungs can be viewed from other angles. You need to remain very still during the scans to avoid blurring the pictures.

Afterward, the radioactive gas will clear from your lungs as you breathe.

Perfusion scan

    The perfusion scan takes about 15 to 30 minutes.

    For the perfusion scan, the injection site on your arm will be cleaned and an elastic band will be placed around your upper arm. Then a small amount of the radioactive tracer is injected, usually into a vein on the inside of your elbow.

    After the injection, the camera will start scanning for radiation released by the tracer and will produce pictures of its distribution in your lungs. You may be asked to move into different positions (onto your side and stomach) so your lungs can be viewed from other angles. You need to remain very still during the scans to avoid blurring the pictures.

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After Care

After the test, you may resume all normal activities. You should preferably be accompanied by someone with you after you finish your exam.

The radiologist's report of the results will be ready within 24 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results of the test with you.

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Please call our hotline 16171 or (202) 3336-3310 (Mohandeseen), (202) 2417 5556 (Heliopolis) or (202) 2528 4888 (Maadi) to speak with a radiologist if you have any questions. It is best to call between 10 a.m. and 10 p.m., Saturday through Thursday.

 

Thyroid Scan Renal Isotopes Thalium Scan (Stress test) Hepatobiliary (GB) scan Bone Scan Ventilation/Perfusion (Lung) scan 131I MIBG scan Adrenal Scan
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Last modified: 17-06-2009