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CT Scan

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Alfa Scan is proud to announce the presence of Multislice (64 channel) CT scanners (MSCT) in all of its three branches.

 

CT scan provides a different and more detailed picture of tissue and bone than is possible with a routine X-ray. The scan itself is painless and very safe. Your radiation exposure is slightly more than a routine X-ray. 

 

Multislice CT scanners provide thinner, more detailed slices of the scanned part of the body in a much faster time and less exposure to the patient. This has led to the facilitation of doing more techniques of areas of the body that were not available before the production of these scanners.

 

What is CT scan?

Are there risks in obtaining a CT scan?

Available equipment

Contrast media

Anaesthesia

Available techniques

MSCT techniques

What is CT scan?

A computerized axial tomography scan is an x-ray procedure that combines many x-ray images with the aid of a computer to generate cross-sectional views and, if needed, three-dimensional images of the internal organs and structures of the body. Computerized axial tomography is more commonly known by its abbreviated names, CT scan or CAT scan. A CT scan is used to define normal and abnormal structures in the body and/or assist in procedures by helping to accurately guide the placement of instruments or treatments.

 

A large donut-shaped x-ray machine takes x-ray images at many different angles around the body. These images are processed by a computer to produce cross-sectional pictures of the body. In each of these pictures the body is seen as an x-ray "slice" of the body, which is recorded on a film. This recorded image is called a tomogram. "Computerized Axial Tomography" refers to the recorded tomogram "sections" at different levels of the body.

 

Imagine the body as a loaf of bread and you are looking at one end of the loaf. As you remove each slice of bread, you can see the entire surface of that slice from the crust to the center. The body is seen on CT scan slices in a similar fashion from the skin to the central part of the body being examined. When these levels are further "added" together, a three-dimensional picture of an organ or abnormal body structure can be obtained.

 

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Are there risks in obtaining a CT scan?

A CT scan is a very low-risk procedure. The most common problem is an adverse reaction to intravenous contrast material. Intravenous contrast is usually an iodine-based liquid given in the vein, which makes many organs and structures, such as the kidneys and blood vessels much more visible on the CT scan. There may be resulting itching, a rash, hives, or a feeling of warmth throughout the body. These are usually self-limiting reactions that go away rather quickly. If needed, antihistamines can be given to help relieve the symptoms. A more serious allergic reaction to intravenous contrast is called an anaphylactic reaction. When this occurs, the patient may experience severe hives and/or extreme difficulty in breathing. This reaction is quite rare, but is potentially life-threatening if not treated. Medications which may include corticosteroids, antihistamines, and epinephrine can reverse this adverse reaction.

Toxicity to the kidneys which can result in kidney failure is an extremely rare complication of the intravenous contrast material used in CT scans. People with diabetes, dehydrated individuals, or patients who already have impaired kidney function are most prone to this reaction. Newer intravenous contrast agents have been developed, which have nearly eliminated this complication.

The amount of radiation a person receives during a CT scan is minimal. In men and non-pregnant women, it has not been shown to produce any adverse effects. If a woman is pregnant, there may be a potential risk to the fetus, especially in the first trimester of the pregnancy. If a woman is pregnant, she should inform her doctor of her condition and discuss other potential methods of imaging, such as an ultrasound, which are not harmful to the fetus.

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Available Equipment

  • Single slice CT scanners in all the branches

  • Multislice (64 channel) CT scanners in all the branches

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Contrast media

  • Normal ionic contrast media

  • Low-osmolar, non-ionic contrast media (for hyperallergic and sensitive patients)

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Anaesthesia

Anaesthesia, local or general, may be available upon request. For children or irritable patients, anaesthesia will be inevitable.

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Available Techniques include:

Specific Techniques for the MSCT include:

Please call our hotline 16171 or (202) 3336-3310 (Mohandeseen), (202) 2417 5556 (Heliopolis) or (202) 2528 4888 (Maadi) to speak with a radiologist if you have any questions. It is best to call between 10 a.m. and 10 p.m., Saturday through Thursday.

   

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Copyright 2008 Alfa Scan Radiology Center
Last modified: 17-06-2009